Puerto Madryn and Puerto Piramides

Pretty Puerto Piramides

My second trip to this region was 11 months after my first, and my additional time on the bodacious Valdez peninsula greatly enhanced my grasp of the place. I spent just one night at the very cool Gualicho hostel in Madryn, after landing at Trelew airport and then getting a ride from a mighty friendly local who had just picked up a friend on the same flight. She told me that her kids also ‘hacen dedo’ (hitchhike), and it was a great way to land and roll into the sweet port town, that is, city now, of over 100,000.

Wandering around town and primarily the beachside sidewalk, the only oddity was not being able to walk out onto the municipal pier due to a cruise ship being anchored there, and the authority telling me that no one could enter ho wasn’t a passenger on the big boat, ‘due to security issues’. This coincided with the corona virus hysteria sweeping the globe, so I wasn’t really disappointed in the denial to enter.

This is a real ‘Seal Beach’

I did treat myself to a fine fish dinner at Chona’s , right in the middle of town on the seafront, as it was recommended by everybody I asked. Excellent food and service at very decent prices make for a solid formula, and we also hit it for a premium lunch the day I flew out.

Loberia at Punta Lomas

Something new this time around was driving south out to the splendid sea lion loberia a few kilometers past Punta Loma. A ranger station overlooks two separate clusters of the aquatic lions, hundreds in number but just a drop in the bucket to the estimated 100,000 in all of Argentina. The seabirds are numerous here as well and the two viewpoints provide a smashing vista of the massive colony here. Well worth the drive, short walk and nasty smell.

The terrain around these parts is extraordinary

I noticed at least two big changes at Puerto Piramides from last year, the first being that the Hostel Bahia Ballena, where I stayed on my first trip, was no longer the unofficial info center for the Orca comings and goings out at Playa Norte. The one day we took the hour drive out there, the Orcas didn’t show, although they had visited the day prior. The sea lion colony there now stretches out a half kilometer on the beach, so the chances of observing a serious Orca encounter would seem to be greatly enhanced.

The ‘line up’ at Playa Norte aka Orca Beach

Unfortunately, the big black and whites had other things to do that day, so I’m now just batting .500 in my two visits. It’s still a grand place to spend 5 hours, as the ocean is mesmerizing and the birds and sea lions are visually hypnotic in their own way. There were less people than last April, and most were more than willing to spend as much time as necessary in order to get the look of a lifetime at one of the planet’s animal wonders. All, that is, except a big tourist bus full of elderly passengers, perhaps from that same cruise ship, who stayed all of 15 minutes before driving off.

But no Orca visit today

The other big change, for me at least, was finding out the mass influx of beach lovers who invade Piramides on a sunny, warm weekend. The sheer quantity of humanity was staggering, and I had a difficult time understanding where they all came from. Puerto Madryn is an hour away, with a nice beach of it’s own, and Trelew another 45 minutes beyond. There are few folks living on the vast peninsula, so the crowds had to be comprised of the other townies, and it was night and day compared to the usual weekday scene. The clog of vehicles and full eateries were probably way welcomed by the local businesses, but also grateful it doesn’t load up like that every day.

The low tide walk to the caves on the way to Punta Pardelas

Besides a fine beach walk across the bay to snorkel at the jumbo sea caves, where the crabs outnumbered all else, and we came across five hot pink flamingoes wading in the shallows we drove across the skinny isthmus to snorkel at Playa Villarino. This was my first close look at Golfo San Jose, the northern, less gigantic counterpart to Golfo Nuevo, where Puerto Piramides is located. This was a smooth 20k on a graded gravel road, and I was surprised to see a cluster of RV’s spread across the beach above Playa Arralde. We drove a bit south, where there was just one car parked, and found a spot to park and access the clear, cool water. The sand bars here, like around Piramides, are called ‘restingas’, and are submerged and then dried out again twice daily, as the tides are substantial.

Beaut water and trippy sandbars at Playa Villamino

I estimated five meters, and the motion of the rising tide is dramatic and rapid. Here we floated in the shallows, not seeing many fish, but at least one colony of spider crabs, and another of colorful sea snails. We spent an hour and a half that could have been stretched to 3 or 4 quite easily, as the place was relaxing to the point of catatonia. There were penguins all over the place, chasing fish underwater or sitting like a duck on top of it. We also spotted a pod of dolphins through the binoculars from the viewpoint at the end of the road that goes right at the top of the hill that drops into town. I hiked to this last year, and it’s worth an hour at the end of the day gazing across the monumental bay and cliffs, with the raw sound of lobos bellowing loco below.

Penguins are ll over the place

Conclusions: A vehicle is a big plus, as far as getting around to the remote sections of the peninsula. There were several main roads closed during this time around, including the coast road that connects Punta Norte, Orca Central, with Punta Cantor, 47 km due south. Cantor can still be reached from the turnoff Hwy 3, just past the Salitral, one of three large salt flats here. It’s 33km from the turnoff to Cantor, and then another 42 km further south to Punta Delgada, where the site was closed. Orcas are known to frequent Cantor, and that’s reason enough to show up, but they are much more regular at Punta Norte.

Guanacos number in the thousands here

In addition, the road from Piramides to Punta Pardelas was closed due to sand dunes covering the surface. I didn’t verify this and wish I had, as Pardelas is the location of choice among the snorkeling crowd, of which I am one. Mountain Bikes can be rented, as well as kayaks, which are gold on a calm day and can easily reach Pardelas in less than an hour. The bikes can too, as long as the sometimes big heat factor is not a problem. An ideal way to explore this area is flying in to Trelew, spending a night each coming and going through Madryn, and then 3 or 4 in Piramides covering as much ground and water as necessary, or possible. It’s worth the effort, big time.

The lobos love the restingas….sandbars